Current Research



http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/GeneralInfectiousDisease/13327

Robert Pass, M.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine and his colleagues have been experimenting with CMV to find a vaccine for the virus. The team developed a vaccine based on only one CMV antigen and an adjuvent (trigger immune responses for greater vaccine delivery). The test consisted of 441 women (CMV-negative) between the ages of 14 and 40. Some women were given a placebo, while others received the vaccine. The results showed that 8% of women in the vaccine group contracted CMV but 14% of women contracted CMV in the placebo group. Out of the 81 children born to mothers in the vaccine group, only one was born with CMV (1%), compared to the 3% of CMV-infected children born to mothers in the placebo group. The results of the reduction of congenital CMV was too close to call, but the testing has given researchers promising answers to a potential CMV vaccine.